Feeds:
Posts
Comments

2015’s Stats

So I finally got around to entering my projects from the last few months into KnitMeter…

There was also a little bit of weaving, but only one project, so I didn’t count it here.

It’s amazing how low my yardage is when I only knit one sweater during the year. I hope to remedy that in 2016.

2015 in Review

Highlights: Lots of hats, lots of socks, and several projects for work.
Lowlights: Only one sweater done.😦 And I would have liked to do more spinning and weaving.

Here are some of my favorites:

Click any of the pictures above to enter the gallery and see captions.

Further details available (including links to patterns, where I used one) on my Ravelry projects 2015 tab. (You must be logged into Ravelry to view.)

I already have a good head start on 2016 with a bulky-gauge sweater on the needles. At 3.5 stitches per inch, it’s working up very quickly.

IMG_2880

I’m using the Seamless Yoke – Adult sweater pattern from Ann Budd’s Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters. The majority is knit in Cascade Yarns Eco Wool (Bovska undyed cream colorway), and the contrast color in the yoke is Targhee from Spunky Eclectic that I handspun (purchased at the NH Sheep & Wool Festival in May 2015 and spun the week after). At this point, most was done with one 200-gram skein of Eco Wool and 57 grams of the handspun. I just started the second skein of Eco Wool a few rows back, and I’m planning on using the rest of the handspun for a rolled reverse-stockinette edging on the cuffs, bottom hem, and neckline. Buttonbands will be done in Eco Wool in garter stitch. The whole sweater is garter stitch as well. Easy-peasy.

Quick catch-up

Here’s what I’ve been up to lately…

Back around the end of September, I finished a pair of Trellis & Cable Socks (my own pattern) using yarn gifted to me by a yarn shop friend prior to moving to NH more than 6 years ago.

T&C2 Socks

In November, I finished up a design for a knitted dog leash (yes, a knitted dog leash). It’s currently only available from Patternworks as a kit in 4 color choices (kit includes the pattern, 1 skein of Peruvia Quick, and a swivel hook).

803466__set_DogLeash_medium2

Photo by Evelyn Lamprey.

Also in November, I knitted Craig a new Batman hat to match his new Batman sweatshirt with the modern bat logo. “But the greys don’t match,” he said. Tough.

batmanhat

And just today, I whipped up two mini-cup cozies to fit the teeny 8-oz. cappuccino to-go cups at the local coffee shop. (The standard cardboard coffee cup sleeves are too big!) These tiny cups are approximately 6.75″ circumference at the bottom.

Instructions for the one on the left:

Using #6 (4.00mm) needles and leftover bits of worsted-weight yarn… CO 32, join in round.
Knit 1 rnd.
Rnd 1: K2tog, (yo twice, ssk, k2tog) rep ( ) to last 2 sts, yo twice, ssk.
Rnd 2: Knit around, working double yo’s as knit in first yo, knit in back loop of second yo.
Rep Rnds 1 & 2 to desired height, ending with Rnd 2. Knit 1 rnd. Bind off loosely.
(Yes, pattern biases a bit.)

Instructions for the one on the right:

Using #6 (4.00mm) needles and leftover bits of worsted-weight yarn… CO 32, join in round.
Rnd 1: K1, (p2, k2) rep ( ) to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
Rep Rnd 1 until work measures 1” from CO.
Inc Rnd: K1, (pfb, p1, k2, p2, k2) rep ( ) to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
Next Rnd: K1, (p3, k2, p2, k2) rep ( ) to last 3 sts, p2, k1.
Rep last Rnd to desired height.
BO in ribbing.

Happy October! It’s my favorite month of the year, and fall is my favorite season of all. Just this week, I released two new hat patterns in my Ravelry store:

NavajoHatsForest Fronds Beanie (right) and Slouch (left) hats

A twisted-rib brim flows into panels of baby-fern stitch, each separated by a column of single twisted stitches. The crown decreases are worked into the baby-fern stitch panels for a smooth transition at the top.

These hats feature Tahki Select Navajo yarn, a self-striping, rustic yet soft, single-ply 100% wool. Pattern includes instructions for two sizes for each hat. The beanie takes 1 ball for either size, and the slouch takes 1 ball for the medium size and 2 balls for the large size. Medium size for each is shown in the photo. Slouch is shown in color #3, and beanie is shown in color #5.

Get all the details on Ravelry, and download the pattern from Ravelry or my blog.

And if you’re looking for Navajo yarn, I’d be really, really happy if you ordered it from Patternworks!

photo by Evelyn S. Lamprey

900398_EssentialAcceMo3_medium2Big Cable Slouch Hat

(My friend and coworker Alison can really rock the slouch hats, can’t she?!)

This little gem was originally the third installment in the Patternworks Essential Accessories club. Now you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry apart from the club. (Clubs are still available – 12 kits, one each month for 12 months – which you can join here!) Hat above is shown in color #3653, Stormy Sea.

I. Love. Big. Cables and I cannot lie! This hat has ’em, separated by columns of garter stitch. It features Ty-Dy Wool by Knit One, Crochet Too (one of my favorite yarn companies run by some of my favorite yarny people, in my neighboring state of Maine). Just one ball is all you’ll need!

Get all the details on Ravelry, and you can purchase the pattern there, too (you don’t have to be a Ravelry member).

photo by Ashley Wakefield

Later this month, I’ll be turning another year older. And to celebrate, I’m offering a coupon code for 50% off my just-released Ziggity Socks pattern! Just use coupon code BDAY50 at checkout on Ravelry. (Sale ends 8/19/15!)

buy-now

900394_ToeUpSOM8_medium2

Originally available as part of Patternworks’ new Toe-Up Sock of the Month™ Club, the Ziggity Socks pattern is now available to purchase separately through Ravelry! These socks feature a zigzagging pattern on the foot and leg, and an afterthought heel to maintain the pattern in self-striping yarn.

Size: Ladies Small (Medium, Large); 6.75 (7.5, 8.25)” circumference, unstretched and approx. 11.5 (13, 14.25)” circumference, fully stretched

Materials:
Stretch Socks by Patons, 2 balls
(This yarn is discontinued, so substitute 100 grams of any fingering-weight sock yarn. Great for self-striping yarns!)
32” to 40” circular U.S. #1 (2.25mm) or #2 (2.75mm), or substitute dps if desired, or size needed for gauge

Gauge:
8.25 sts x 12.5 rounds = 1” in stockinette

Pattern price: $5.00 (save 50% through August 19th, 2015 with coupon code BDAY50 on Ravelry!)

Summer update

Wow, how did it get to be August already?!

Catching up from my last post… the kitty blanket was finished just a week later:

kittyblanket

And I picked up some Cascade Eco Wool to be used with the handspun targhee in a striped-yoke sweater:

ecotarghee

I also finished a Mohair Bias Loop (Churchmouse pattern) for a photo shoot for work.
Kits are available in six different colors from Patternworks.

Photo by Evelyn S. Lamprey

Photo by Evelyn S. Lamprey

I finished a pair of socks using Miss Babs Yummy superwash yarn – made up the pattern as I went.

sliptwist

I retooled my TV Tray Socks to have a double-thick bottom – so hopefully they last longer and I won’t have to knit new ones as frequently:

dttvtraysocks

I went on a bit of a Footie Socks kick (this was the fourth pair in about a month’s time):

footies

Most recently, I finished a Ribbed Beanie and Handwarmers (another Churchmouse pattern) for yet another photo shoot for work:

beanie handwarmers

I’ve also been working on a Random-Stripe Boxy sweater. I used the Random Stripe Generator to determine the striping sequence, and I’m using four different colorways of String Theory Caper Sock. (I originally purchased them to knit shawls… but realized I just don’t wear shawls. But I wear sweaters.) At first, I tried to knit jogless stripes, but it just wasn’t working. I was also trying to carry the unused colors up the side, and that wasn’t working either. So with each color change I’m cutting the yarn, and weaving in ends after every few color changes.

randomboxy

(left – jogless stripes, which didn’t turn out jogless; right – cutting yarn with each color change and weaving in ends, not jogless either, but much neater!)

boxyback

(inside of the sweater, weaving in ends as I go)

And just this past weekend, I found myself in need of a sock project to work on while riding in the car. So I frogged half a sock I started way back in January 2014 and never got back to – and I didn’t feel like trying to figure out where I was (since I was in the process of designing it at the time and not following an existing pattern). Instead, I cast on my Trellis and Cable Socks pattern from the opposite end of the skein. (Pattern is available on Ravelry.)

trelliscable

The Targhee has dried, and I. LOVE. IT.

TargheeFinished

  • Fiber: Spunky Eclectic Targhee in the Dark Matters colorway
  • Main Skein: 147 yards (105 grams), bulky weight, very thick-n-thin, 2-plied
  • Leftovers Skein: 11.5 yards (11 grams), bulky weight, Navajo-plied
  • Further details on Ravelry.

I’ve also made a little progress with the weaving:

KittyBlanketWeavingJust a little progress! That’s somewhere between 4″-5″.

It’s threaded at a sett of 5 ends per inch, which is really too wide. I would have been happier with something close to a balanced weave, but this is extremely weft-faced. You really don’t see the warp at all. I tried sampling some different treadlings – plain weave, basket weave, twill – but you really can’t see them, so I’m sticking with plain weave for the rest. I have a lot of handspun for the weft, but I have no more of the yarn I used for the warp, so I’ll just weave until I run out of yarn (or warp length) and see what I end up with!

When I first learned to weave, I always just wrapped the yarn the long way around the center of the stick shuttle – and of course, usually ended up with a shuttle that was hard to get through the shed until enough of the yarn had been taken off the shuttle and woven in. Now, more than 25 years later, I learned the method that you can sort of see in the photo above, which I learned while previewing Liz Gipson’s Life After Warping DVD at work. You wrap in figure-8’s on one side, then wrap the center for a while, then wrap in figure-8’s on the other side. It makes for a much flatter shuttle while still holding a lot of yarn!