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Posts Tagged ‘FOs’

After finishing off two sweater WIPs in December (Cabled Turtleneck and Boxy), realizing that I have at least six sweater quantities of yarn in my stash, and the hubby reminding me that NH Sheep & Wool is coming up soon (in three months), I’ve been motivated to knit more sweaters.

Immediately after finishing Boxy, I cast on Sunshine Coast by Heidi Kirrmaier. I decided on this one first because the yarn was one of the older sweater quantities I had on hand, and because it would be nice to have a spring/summer sweater ready to wear when spring/summer eventually arrives here in New Hampshire. It was a fast knit – just 15 days from start to finish! I made some slight modifications:

  • Added 8 extra stitches in the bust, on the front only. I worked 4 additional increase rounds, and then decreased those stitches away below the bust.
  • Made the neckline narrower by picking up stitches around it, working 4 rounds in reverse stockinette (purl), and bound off in purl so it rolls inward.
  • I shortened the sleeves by eliminating the last ten-row repeat (which eliminated one decrease round as well). The sleeves would have been too long (more like full length instead of 3/4) without this modification.
  • Though this wasn’t really a modification, I opted for the garter stitch edging option on the bottom hem and sleeves instead of letting the stockinette roll up on itself.

This was an enjoyable project! I love how Heidi incorporates the increases (yarnovers) as a design element at the neckline and down the sides. And the raglan increases flow nicely into diagonal panels from the underarms to the bottom hem.

SunshineCoast

Sunshine Coast Pullover

And the very next day after finishing up Sunshine Coast, I cast on a Hiro cardigan using yarn I bought at NH Sheep & Wool in 2017. Of course, I knit a couple of swatches first! My gauge came out looser than the gauge specified in the pattern, so I ended up following the instructions for the smallest size (34″ bust) to end up with about a 42″ bust. I also added some more increase rounds to get 4 more stitches in the bust (on the front only). I decreased away these extra stitches on the second round after joining the sleeves and body together to work the yoke. Additional modifications made:

  • Instead of knitting flat in rows as the pattern specifies for the cardigan version, I worked in the round and added five steek stitches down the center front.
  • I despise the idea of knitting a buttonband separately and sewing/seaming it on. Instead, I followed Kate Davies’ steeking tutorial and knit stockinette facings in a “steek sandwich” with an I-cord bindoff. Mine had the added twist of being worked with a little intarsia where the colors changed in the yoke.

I knit this pattern by Julia Farwell-Clay before, but as a pullover. I really enjoyed steeking and I’m looking forward to doing it again on another project someday. I liked the idea of the steek sandwich, but wasn’t happy with how thick it made the buttonbands. The I-cord edging gave a nice finish, especially with the buttonholes worked right next to it so they sort of hide a little when the cardigan is unbuttoned. Next time I knit a steeked cardigan, I’ll probably finish the steek on the wrong side with ribbon or fabric instead.

The yarn I used isn’t available online anywhere that I can find. It’s called Cheshire Sheep Yarn (100% wool) and it came from a farm in Nelson, NH that had a booth at NH Sheep & Wool. It was extremely pleasant to work with; it had a bit of a rustic look in the skein but was relatively soft to the touch. It appeared to be a woolen-spun yarn and worked up to more of a chunky gauge, though the weight to yardage ratio was more in the Aran range. Once washed, it bloomed and evened out beautifully.

As I write this, the cardigan is still on the bed drying, and I haven’t yet sewn on the buttons. I’m going with these cat buttons from Katrinkles, and plan to sew them on using embroidery floss in the same colors as the yoke (making bowties magically appear on the kitties). The buttons are another thing I bought at NH Sheep & Wool, last year.

If you look closely at the photo below, you’ll notice the color changes in the buttonbands differ on each side. I knit the one on the right (left front) first and wasn’t sure I was happy with it. I’m not entirely happy with how it ended up on the right front either. But once I’m wearing it, I don’t think the difference will be quite as noticeable. When buttoned, the buttonbands will overlap; and when unbuttoned, they won’t be right next to each other.

HiroCardi

Hiro Cardigan

And now that I’ve finished knitting this sweater (in just three weeks!), I’m looking forward to the next one. I’ll be making another summer top, Novel-T by Laura Nelkin. I’ve already downloaded the pattern, but I’m making myself wait until I get the buttons sewn onto my Hiro cardigan before casting on anything new.

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In 2018, I completed:

  • 7 pairs of socks
  • 7 hats (including 1 headband)
  • 4 other accessories (2 cowls, a shawl, a crocheted scarf)
  • 2 sweaters (one of which was cast on over 3 years ago, and one of which I cast on last year)
  • 1 baby blanket

Of the items above, 3 of them were knit for work – for blog posts and/or photo shoots.

In chronological order of completion:

Not pictured above, 1 pair of socks I never took any photos of!

If you want details on any of these, and you’re on Ravelry, check them out in my Ravelry projects.

The Cube Socks were particularly interesting. They’re knit using a new-to-me method of intarsia, and I wrote two posts for the Interweave blog – one for WIP Wednesday and one for FO Friday.

I started the Cabled Turtleneck last year, in November. It then sat in my knitting bag from March until this past November, when I finally pulled it back out, knit the second sleeve, and finished it off. I used Ann Budd’s The Knitter’s Handy Book of Sweater Patterns for the basic set-in sleeve sweater structure, and incorporated Barbara McIntire’s cable pattern from The Great American Aran Afghan booklet.

After finding the Miki hat pattern on Ravelry, I liked it so much I ended up knitting four hats and a headband out of it! I may end up using it for socks at some point as well.

Finally, my Random Stripe Boxy sweater. I started it on May 3, 2015 and finally finished it on December 28, 2018. It was absolutely worth weaving in a ridiculous number of ends created by all of the color changes! I had three semisolid skeins of Caper Sock that I bought to knit a Color Affection Shawl… then later came to the realization that I simply don’t wear shawls. I also had another two skeins of Caper Sock in the Nerrivik colorway that I bought sometime after the other three skeins, but before I accepted the fact that I’m not a shawl person. Fortunately, the Nerrivik colorway coordinated nicely with the semisolid shades, so I combined them for the sweater. I still have enough Nerrivik and Peridot (the lime green colorway) to knit a pair of socks with contrasting toe/heel/cuff or some other two-color accessory.

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Here’s how 2017 turned out:

  • 16 finished projects
  • 5 pairs of socks
  • 3 pairs of mittens
  • 3 scarves/cowls
  • 2 shawls
  • 1 baby blanket
  • 1 sweater
  • 1 hat
  • 1 poncho
  • 5 gifts knitted
  • 4 items knit for work
  • 2 new designs for work
  • 2 items knit with handspun
  • 2 spins of 4 oz. each completed (and knit into the 2 handspun projects listed above)

Finished since my last post were two pairs of socks, and a poncho I knit as a photography sample for work.

In order from most recently finished to earliest finished:

Also started in 2017, but not yet finished:

ZickZack Scarf using Queensland Uluru (solid) and Uluru Rainbow (self-striping) yarn. It’s much further along than it is in the photo above, I just haven’t taken another one recently. I haven’t yet decided if I’ll keep this or if it will be a gift.

Big Granny Square Sock Yarn Scrap Blankie using a variety of leftover sock yarns, many of which are the same yarns I’m using in my mitered-square sock yarn blankie. I started this after Interweave published a blog article on granny squares. As with my other sock yarn blanket, this is an ongoing project that will get done whenever.

Cabled Turtleneck Sweater using Knit One, Crochet Too Meadow Silk yarn. I picked up this yarn at the Keepsake Quilting/Patternworks tent sale this past June (along with several other sweater quantities of other yarns). I’m generally following the adult set-in sleeve sweater from The Knitter’s Handy Book of Sweater Patterns by Ann Budd. I will, however, make this seamless by working a three-needle bind-off on the shoulders, and picking up stitches around the armholes and knitting the sleeves downward toward the cuffs.

Fall Night Hiking Socks using Regia Design Line by Arne & Carlos sock yarn (in the Fall Night colorway). I finished a pair of socks and needed another pair for car knitting. However, all but the first three inches of this sock so far has been knit while walking on the treadmill. I’ll probably pick back up with knitting these in the car again soon, though. I also have a plane trip coming up shortly, and will probably take them along for that.

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I feel like I haven’t gotten in as much knitting this year as I usually do… here are a couple things I wasn’t yet able to reveal the last time I posted, as well as several things I’ve finished since then.

Kata Asymmetrical Shawl (photos by Evelyn Lamprey for Patternworks)

This is a quick and easy pattern I designed as a free pattern download with the purchase of Queensland Collection’s Uluru Rainbow yarn, for Patternworks. The yarn is now sold out – but I’m planning to make this available as a free download on Ravelry as soon as I get a chance to reformat the pattern in my own template.

StripyMiters

Stripy Miters Baby Blanket (photo by Evelyn Lamprey for Patternworks)

This is another pattern I designed for Patternworks, featuring DMC’s Natura XL cotton yarn. I love mitered squares, and this was a really fun construction. It’s completely seamless, constructed modularly, and finished with a crocheted edging. The pattern is available as a PDF download on the Interweave site.

Hot Flash Cardigan

I think I bought the yarn for this last year, or maybe it was fall of 2015, shortly after Laura Nelkin released the pattern. I loved working with the yarn, Soie et Lin from Knit One, Crochet Too, and I’m in love with Laura’s modular “Novus” construction! I definitely want to make another sweater in this structure – whether that actually happens remains to be seen…

More mittens – Since I had yarn left over from a 2-color hat I knit a couple (a few? several?) years ago for a catalog shoot, I made a pair of matching mittens. These are essentially the same as the red/orange ones from my previous post, but in two different colors of Ty-Dy Wool by Knit One, Crochet Too.

Ghost Ranch Shawlette CAL – Yup, I crocheted something! This was a project for work. I joined in the crochet-along with the Interweave team. You can read the Interweave blog posts about it here, here and here. I really enjoyed the pattern, and it worked up super fast.

B to the Three hat – During a visit to Interweave back in May, Anne Merrow challenged me to spin more. So, shortly after returning home, I got right down to it and quickly spun up some Mad Color Fiber Arts polwarth that was hanging out in my stash. I made this super-squishy, delightfully slouchy brioche hat with a ginormous pompom, which I gifted to my BFF, Mela, during our girls’ weekend in July. (I also spun up some alpaca fiber, which became the Winternet Scarf mentioned below.)

Cat’s Mittens – While hiking Mt. Adams in August, the topic of mittens came up (since we were all wearing mittens or gloves at various times above treeline due to chilly winds). I forget the exact course of the conversation, but it ended with me offering to knit some mittens for Cat. She’s an artist, and truly appreciates handknits, so I was glad to provide her hands with some toasty warmth for this coming winter!

Hiking socks for Devon – So, I’ve knit hiking socks for Lucy, and mittens for Cat. Of course I had to knit something for Devon, who is the fourth member of our core hiking group. I took photos of several skeins, and she picked the Crocus colorway of Knit One, Crochet Too’s Crock-O-Dye. After seeing how it was knitting up, I wanted a skein for myself – and luckily we still had some left (on sale!) in the Patternworks shop. This is my Fill-In-The-Blank Socks pattern, in plain stockinette.

In the past seven months, I’ve also finished a Winternet Scarf (which I had to reverse-engineer from the designer’s photos on Ravelry, since the pattern wasn’t available), knit from handspun alpaca and gifted to my friend Cyn during our girls’ weekend in July; a brioche cowl, gifted to my friend Tina on the same trip; and a pair of plain stockinette socks in Plymouth’s Forever Heathers self-striping yarn for myself, which I just haven’t gotten around to taking a photo of yet. Unfortunately, I forgot to take a photo of the scarf and cowl before I gifted them to Cyn and Tina.

Polwarth on the left, Alpaca on the right.

Something old(ish) and something new. The Polwarth fiber was from Mad Color Fiber Arts, purchased at NH Sheep & Wool Festival in 2015 (two years old). Colorway is Berry Patch. I used the larger skein to knit the hat, and the smaller skein became the ginormous pompom of the B to the Three hat. The black/grey Alpaca fiber was purchased from the Skye View Alpaca Farm booth at NH Sheep & Wool this year. I basically returned from the festival, then spun and plied the yarn the very next day! Super-fast spin. The larger skein became the body of the Winternet scarf, and the smaller skein became the tassels on each end.

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Yeah, it’s been quite a while since my last knitting blog post. I’ve been blogging much more about hiking. But I’ve still been knitting! (Just not writing about it.) There are a couple new things I can’t reveal just yet, but here are some highlights of 2016 and early 2017. First, let’s catch up with 2016:

For further details on these projects, see my Ravelry page (login required to see the page, but the specific projects below are set for public viewing).

Next, here’s what I’ve completed so far this year (except for the stuff I can’t share yet):

Further details on these are on my Ravelry page – direct public links to the projects appear below.

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Just off the needles, a Double Heelix double feature!

Double Heelix socks, first pair

  • Pattern: Double Heelix by Jeny Staiman (from Knitty, First Fall 2011)
  • Yarn: Alpaca with a Twist Socrates, color #1019 & #3018
  • Needles: U.S. 1.5 (2.5mm), used magic loop technique
  • Size made: Medium (64-stitch circumference after instep decreases)
  • Started 7/9/11, finished 7/22/11
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

As you can tell by looking at the photo, these came out too loose. Not surprised, since 64-stitch socks on 2.5mm needles always come out too big for me. But I took a chance since the heel is a unique construction and I was expecting these to be tighter around the ankle (but for me, they weren’t). I alternated the two colors in single-row stripes on the toes, and the last inch before the cuff. Each cuff is a different color. Also switched up the foot and leg colors from one sock to the other. (Yeah, it will look like I’m wearing mis-matched socks. Heh.)

Double Heelix Socks, second pair

  • Pattern, yarn, needles same as above.
  • Size made: Small (60-stitch circumference after instep decreases)
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

Even though I scaled down to the small size for the second pair, these are still a little too loose. But not unwearable by any means. Hard to tell in the photo, but I alternated each color in single-row stripes on the foot and leg. Each cuff is a different color.

I really enjoyed knitting this pattern (obviously, since I did it twice). It can get a bit fiddly at the beginning when you’re working the heel, since there are 4 strands of yarn going. But just pause once in a while to detangle, and you’ll be fine.

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So, this isn’t a new FO, but I finally got around to taking a photo of it.

I Drank The Kool-Aid

I’m referring to this one as “I Drank The Kool-Aid” because there were no less than five of my coworkers knitting it at the same time as me. It had definitely become a mini-trend at the office. A couple of my coworkers have even knit more than one in different yarns! For some silly reason, it took me more than three months to weave in two little yarn ends and wash/block it. For yet another silly unknown reason, it took me nearly a year after finishing the knitting to snap a photo of the thing. (Well, I did make a miserably failed attempt at taking a pic of myself with the cell phone one day when I wore it to work last fall.) If you do knit this project with the Firefly yarn, be aware that it takes every last bit of the two balls of yarn called for. I had about a six- to eight-inch tail at my cast-on edge, and the same after binding off. In fact, I have heard of several Patternworks customers needing to dip into a third ball of yarn in order to finish – so be safe and get a third ball, especially if you typically end up using more yardage than a pattern calls for.

And now, we move on down to the feet…

Jaytrekkers

  • Pattern: Jaywalker by Grumperina
  • Yarn: Trekking XXL, color #80 (faux-isle self patterning yarn with pinks, purples, grays and browns)
  • Needle: U.S. 1 (2.25mm), Clover Takumi 5″ long DPNs (AKA overgrown toothpicks)
  • Started 2/14/11, finished 7/3/11
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

The pattern may look sort of familiar – you’ve seen it on here twice before. This is the pattern I used for my second-ever pair of socks and also for a pair of socks made for my cousin Jill. They turned out to be a little snug over the ankles as Jadee reminded me on Plurk, but I can still get them on my feet. If I do knit these yet again (which I just might, I love the pattern) I will probably use U.S. 1.5 (2.5mm) needles just to have a wee bit extra room in the ankle. It wasn’t a problem with the first pair I made, since they’re (duh) anklets. (And damn, now I’m really hoping that Jill’s weren’t too tight! She does have smaller feet than me, so hopefully hers were OK.) It took me a while to finish these, since I knit the first sock and about half of the second sock almost exclusively on breaks at work (the rest was mostly done during long car rides). Cast-ons and kitchenering the toes were also done at home.

Recently off the needles – but not finished – is a cowl design for work. Not finished yet because it needs buttons, so I will be shopping for some this week. More on that later. Still on the needles – but finally more than halfway done – is a super secret project for a friend. My motivation to finish that (besides finishing a project for a friend) within the next month is the KnitGirllls 5K Stash Dash. (I’m at 2,692 meters knit… just a little over halfway there! Not sure if I’ll hit 5K by the deadline, but hopefully I will be close.) A perpetual item on the needles is my sock yarn blankie – I really should pick that up again, especially considering I recently received a little care package in the mail from my Pennsylvania knitting peeps, Cathy and Denise.

Sock Yarn Scraps from Cathy & Denise (miss you both too!)

And considering I haven’t had any socks on the needles since I finished the Jaywalkers on July 3rd (gasp!), I shall be casting on the Double Heelix socks from Knitty shortly. Tonight, in fact. I have two skeins of Socrates (#1019 denim and #3018 berry) and my ball winder sitting a few feet away on the sofa, beckoning me.

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I’ve been busy since my last post a little over a month ago! Find yourself a good spot on the sidewalk, the FO parade is coming through town…

Ennoble (Nelkin Designs Mystery KAL)
Quite an unglamorous photo… will probably replace later when I take a better one.

  • Pattern: Ennoble by Laura Nelkin
  • Yarn: Schaefer Yarns Heather, colorway Tatiana Proskuriakoff (T.P. for short!)
  • Needle: U.S. 6 (4.0mm)
  • Started 4/8/11, finished 5/28/11
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

Father’s Day Socks

  • Pattern: my own Father’s Day Socks pattern (garter rib panels on front and back flanked by small cables)
  • Yarn: Austermann Step Zodiac, Capricorn colorway (even though Dad is a Virgo…)
  • Needles: U.S. 0 (2.0mm) Addi Turbo, 40″ circular (magic loop, one at a time)
  • Started 5/5/11, finished 5/28/11
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

Preemie hats for Sweet Caroline Project

  • Pattern: Preemie Baby Beanies by Karen Everitt (basic construction, used stitches from sock patterns on them)
  • Yarns: (L-R) Southwest Trading TOFUtsies, Zitron Trekking Maxima, Plymouth Sockotta (all leftovers from socks – left and center – and baby sweater – right)
  • Needle: U.S. 2 (2.75mm)
  • First one started 6/5/11, third one finished 6/10/11 (each one took 2 evenings of knitting)
  • Link to my Ravelry project pages: #1, #2, #3 (login required)

Mysteriously Sublime Shawlette

Deep V Sweater Monstrosity!

  • Pattern: Deep V Sweater from Classic Knits by Erika Knight
  • Yarn: Elsebeth Lavold Silky Tweed
  • Needles: U.S. 3 (3.25mm) and 5 (3.75mm)
  • Started 1/5/09 (yes, that’s 2009), finished 6/18/11 (yes, that’s 2011)
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (do I really need to tell you again that login is required?)

This one requires some commentary… After nearly two-and-a-half years on the needles, I’m really disappointed that this turned out to be a waaaaay huge hot mess of a monstrosity. That’s the problem with an adult sweater knit in pieces and seamed together after all the hours, days, months, YEARS of knitting has been completed. (At least with baby sweaters, if they’re too big, the baby will eventually grow into it.) Holding the individual pieces up on my body, I thought for sure the sweater would be too small, if anything. Well, it’s freakin’ bigger-than-plus sized. It’s linebacker sized. Might even be too big for a linebacker. Sheesh. I knit a generously-sized swatch, which I’ve run through the washer (cold water, frontloader) and dryer (on regular, not even low heat or air fluff… REGULAR HOT DRYER) and the swatch didn’t even shrink at all (which is not at all what I expected). However, the swatch did come out extremely soft after washing and drying. So the sweater wasn’t a total waste of time — at the very least, it will make a great lounging around the house in wintertime sweater. A note about the v-neck: Yes, it’s supposed to be a very deep v-neck… though not quite THAT deep. I’m short. I had the foresight to alter the sleeves so they wouldn’t be gorilla-length (like the rest of the sweater, though, still too big), but I didn’t think to alter the body so the V wouldn’t be quite so low. Duh.

Butin Collar

  • Pattern: Butin Collar by Laura Nelkin
  • Yarn: Schaefer Yarns Audrey, Clare Booth Luce colorway
  • Needle: U.S. 2.5 (3.0mm)
  • Started & finished 6/22/11 (well, clasp was sewn on 6/23/11 before I went to work, so I could wear it that day)
  • Link to my Ravelry project page

This requires a little commentary as well. After the disaster that was the sweater above, this project was an absolute delight. Amy brought a kit back from TNNA (trade show) for me to try out. She gave it to me at work on 6/22/11. I knitted the whole thing that night, in about 3 hours, including the time it took to tediously thread the beads onto the yarn in a specific sequence. It would have taken me a bit less time had I not miscounted the size 8 beads at one spot and had to perform surgery on the yarn to thread on one more bead and do a Russian join to avoid too much bulk in the yarn. This is a GREAT kit — seriously, it includes everything you need except for the knitting needles. There’s even a dental floss threader included for threading the beads onto the yarn. This was also the first time I’ve used Audrey yarn — it’s a wool/silk single that’s absolutely beautiful. I think I really need to pick some up at the shop and make a shawl with it.

But wait… there’s been spinning!

Yes, I’ve been spinning! This is Highland Handmades hand-dyed bluefaced  leicester (that’s a breed of sheep) top in the Maritime colorway. It came with the drop spindle you see in the photo above as part of a beginner spinning kit. The stuff on the spindle has been spun; the fluffy stuff at the top of the photo is the fiber that I’ve pre-drafted (pulled apart to thin out the fibers before spinning). This was from my second session of spinning this fiber (trust me, you do NOT want to see the results of the first session). I’ve since gotten better, more consistent, with a little more practice. I’m a little more than halfway through spinning the whole four ounces of fiber. Not sure what I’ll do with the finished yarn yet. We’ll see what it decides it wants to be.

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So, now that our new niece, Cora, has arrived and the gifts have been given, I can share them with the rest of the world…

Cora’s Blanket & Sweater

  • Patterns: Cradle Me (blanket) and Inky Dinky (jacket) by Anne Hanson
  • Yarn: Plymouth Encore DK, color #233 (lavender)
  • Needles: U.S. 5 (3.75mm) & U.S. 6 (4.0mm) for Cradle Me; U.S. 3 (3.25mm) & U.S. 4 (3.5mm) for Inky Dinky
  • Cradle Me started February 9, finished April 6, 2011; Inky Dinky started April 7, finished April 19, 2011
  • Links to my Ravelry project pages: Cradle Me, Inky Dinky (login required)

Of course, any time there is a new baby arriving in the family, I’m going to be making something. Traditionally, I’ve made handwoven baby blankets. Unfortunately, I don’t have a space to set up my loom right now with all the remodeling going on in our house — it’s still folded up under a blanket in the unfinished dining room. So this time, I opted for knitting. These patterns by Anne Hanson feature a matching lace motif. The jacket pattern offers a wide range of sizes and also includes a matching hat, which I did not make. The blanket was a very easy knit — obviously, since there’s no construction, just a big square. And the jacket was surprisingly easy, too; it’s knit in one piece from the bottom up to the armpits, then the sleeves are knitted separately and joined to knit the yoke in the round.


Inky Dinky, a closer view

And a Mother’s Day gift…

Finishing things up seems to happen in threes. Here’s the third item — a scarf I started last fall which became a Mother’s Day gift for my Mom. It’s a circular scarf that can be worn as-is and longer, or doubled up as a cowl. Heck, you can even double it up and have half around your neck and the other half over your head if it’s cold. Mom doesn’t like things up close to her neck so much, so she’ll probably be wearing it long most of the time. This is my own design which was “homework” for work — it was included in a sheet of free patterns that Patternworks sent out with the purchase of certain limited-edition yarns (which are sold out now, unfortunately).

Circular Scarf for Mom

  • Pattern: my own unnamed design
  • Yarn: Fiesta Yarns Baby Boom, Surf colorway
  • Needles: U.S. 5 (3.75mm)
  • Started September 4, 2010; finished April 19, 2011
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

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So, my camera hadn’t been cooperating very well lately. Rather, it wasn’t cooperating at all. But now that we have a new camera, I can catch up with some FOs that needed photographing.

Mad Color Weave Socks in Araucania Ranco

  • Pattern: Mad Color Weave by Tina Lorin
  • Yarn: Araucania Ranco, color #303
  • Needles: Crystal Palace bamboo DPNs, size U.S. 1 (2.25mm)
  • Started 7/5/10, finished 8/15/10
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

I lovelovelove these socks. First of all, the pattern is gorgeous – looks way more complicated than it really is. The slip-stitch pattern works really well with handpainted, hand-dyed, and variegated yarns. I also really love this yarn. My former LYS (when I lived in PA) carried lots of this yarn for a while. It was all so beautiful, so I ended up buying several hanks in multiple colors (and even bought the same colorway twice, unintentionally). The yarn is especially beautiful with this pattern.

Hermione’s Everyday Socks – in Kollage Sock-A-Licious

  • Pattern: Hermione’s Everyday Socks by Erica Lueder
  • Yarn: Kollage Sock-A-Licious, colorway Blue Mist
  • Needles: Addi Turbo 40″ Circular, size U.S. 1.5 (2.5mm) – magic loop 2-at-a-time
  • Started 9/3/10, finished 10/23/10
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

This was the second time I knit socks using this pattern. However, this time I switched to knitting them toe-up instead of cuff-down (I followed Wendy D. Johnson’s Toe-Up Socks with Slip-Stitch Heel pattern for the sole and heel). And, since I knit them 2-at-a-time on magic loop, I used my Addi circs, which are exactly .25mm larger than the size U.S. 1 DPNs I used the first time. Which means these came out huuuuuge. Plus, the yarn is part silk. Makes it feel really, really nice… but the socks stretch out and don’t snap back as well after washing as wool socks with no silk in them. But they’re great for winter when I need to wear two pairs of socks to shovel snow. I still love them, though.

Seeded Rib Socks – in Zitron Trekking Maxima

  • Pattern: Toe-up Socks with Slip-Stitch Heel by Wendy D. Johnson; added my own seeded rib pattern made up on the fly.
  • Yarn: Zitron Trekking Maxima, color #902
  • Needles: Addi Turbo 40″ Circular, size U.S. 0 (2.0mm) – magic loop but one at a time
  • Started 10/27/10, finished 2/12/11
  • Link to my Ravelry project page (login required)

After finishing up the second pair of Hermione socks, I needed a new pair on the needles for a travel project. I wasn’t sure which socks I wanted to knit next from my Ravelry queue, so I just started something plain and winged it. Ended up with a very nice seeded rib. This pattern would be great for men’s socks – actually, this yarn would be great for men’s socks as well. Like other Trekking yarns, it’s a good workhorse yarn with some nylon content for sturdiness. Very comfortable, and the seeded ribbing is very stretchy.

I’m knitting on several other things right now, but nothing I can share yet since they’re gifts.

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