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Posts Tagged ‘knitting’

I feel like I haven’t gotten in as much knitting this year as I usually do… here are a couple things I wasn’t yet able to reveal the last time I posted, as well as several things I’ve finished since then.

Kata Asymmetrical Shawl (photos by Evelyn Lamprey for Patternworks)

This is a quick and easy pattern I designed as a free pattern download with the purchase of Queensland Collection’s Uluru Rainbow yarn, for Patternworks. The yarn is now sold out – but I’m planning to make this available as a free download on Ravelry as soon as I get a chance to reformat the pattern in my own template.

StripyMiters

Stripy Miters Baby Blanket (photo by Evelyn Lamprey for Patternworks)

This is another pattern I designed for Patternworks, featuring DMC’s Natura XL cotton yarn. I love mitered squares, and this was a really fun construction. It’s completely seamless, constructed modularly, and finished with a crocheted edging. The pattern is available as a PDF download on the Interweave site.

Hot Flash Cardigan

I think I bought the yarn for this last year, or maybe it was fall of 2015, shortly after Laura Nelkin released the pattern. I loved working with the yarn, Soie et Lin from Knit One, Crochet Too, and I’m in love with Laura’s modular “Novus” construction! I definitely want to make another sweater in this structure – whether that actually happens remains to be seen…

More mittens – Since I had yarn left over from a 2-color hat I knit a couple (a few? several?) years ago for a catalog shoot, I made a pair of matching mittens. These are essentially the same as the red/orange ones from my previous post, but in two different colors of Ty-Dy Wool by Knit One, Crochet Too.

Ghost Ranch Shawlette CAL – Yup, I crocheted something! This was a project for work. I joined in the crochet-along with the Interweave team. You can read the Interweave blog posts about it here, here and here. I really enjoyed the pattern, and it worked up super fast.

B to the Three hat – During a visit to Interweave back in May, Anne Merrow challenged me to spin more. So, shortly after returning home, I got right down to it and quickly spun up some Mad Color Fiber Arts polwarth that was hanging out in my stash. I made this super-squishy, delightfully slouchy brioche hat with a ginormous pompom, which I gifted to my BFF, Mela, during our girls’ weekend in July. (I also spun up some alpaca fiber, which became the Winternet Scarf mentioned below.)

Cat’s Mittens – While hiking Mt. Adams in August, the topic of mittens came up (since we were all wearing mittens or gloves at various times above treeline due to chilly winds). I forget the exact course of the conversation, but it ended with me offering to knit some mittens for Cat. She’s an artist, and truly appreciates handknits, so I was glad to provide her hands with some toasty warmth for this coming winter!

Hiking socks for Devon – So, I’ve knit hiking socks for Lucy, and mittens for Cat. Of course I had to knit something for Devon, who is the fourth member of our core hiking group. I took photos of several skeins, and she picked the Crocus colorway of Knit One, Crochet Too’s Crock-O-Dye. After seeing how it was knitting up, I wanted a skein for myself – and luckily we still had some left (on sale!) in the Patternworks shop. This is my Fill-In-The-Blank Socks pattern, in plain stockinette.

In the past seven months, I’ve also finished a Winternet Scarf (which I had to reverse-engineer from the designer’s photos on Ravelry, since the pattern wasn’t available), knit from handspun alpaca and gifted to my friend Cyn during our girls’ weekend in July; a brioche cowl, gifted to my friend Tina on the same trip; and a pair of plain stockinette socks in Plymouth’s Forever Heathers self-striping yarn for myself, which I just haven’t gotten around to taking a photo of yet. Unfortunately, I forgot to take a photo of the scarf and cowl before I gifted them to Cyn and Tina.

Polwarth on the left, Alpaca on the right.

Something old(ish) and something new. The Polwarth fiber was from Mad Color Fiber Arts, purchased at NH Sheep & Wool Festival in 2015 (two years old). Colorway is Berry Patch. I used the larger skein to knit the hat, and the smaller skein became the ginormous pompom of the B to the Three hat. The black/grey Alpaca fiber was purchased from the Skye View Alpaca Farm booth at NH Sheep & Wool this year. I basically returned from the festival, then spun and plied the yarn the very next day! Super-fast spin. The larger skein became the body of the Winternet scarf, and the smaller skein became the tassels on each end.

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Yeah, it’s been quite a while since my last knitting blog post. I’ve been blogging much more about hiking. But I’ve still been knitting! (Just not writing about it.) There are a couple new things I can’t reveal just yet, but here are some highlights of 2016 and early 2017. First, let’s catch up with 2016:

For further details on these projects, see my Ravelry page (login required to see the page, but the specific projects below are set for public viewing).

Next, here’s what I’ve completed so far this year (except for the stuff I can’t share yet):

Further details on these are on my Ravelry page – direct public links to the projects appear below.

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Highlights: Lots of hats, lots of socks, and several projects for work.
Lowlights: Only one sweater done. 😦 And I would have liked to do more spinning and weaving.

Here are some of my favorites:

Click any of the pictures above to enter the gallery and see captions.

Further details available (including links to patterns, where I used one) on my Ravelry projects 2015 tab. (You must be logged into Ravelry to view.)

I already have a good head start on 2016 with a bulky-gauge sweater on the needles. At 3.5 stitches per inch, it’s working up very quickly.

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I’m using the Seamless Yoke – Adult sweater pattern from Ann Budd’s Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters. The majority is knit in Cascade Yarns Eco Wool (Bovska undyed cream colorway), and the contrast color in the yoke is Targhee from Spunky Eclectic that I handspun (purchased at the NH Sheep & Wool Festival in May 2015 and spun the week after). At this point, most was done with one 200-gram skein of Eco Wool and 57 grams of the handspun. I just started the second skein of Eco Wool a few rows back, and I’m planning on using the rest of the handspun for a rolled reverse-stockinette edging on the cuffs, bottom hem, and neckline. Buttonbands will be done in Eco Wool in garter stitch. The whole sweater is garter stitch as well. Easy-peasy.

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I recently ordered the book Socks from the Toe Up by Wendy D. Johnson (blogmistress of Wendy Knits). The book features more than 20 sock patterns, all toe-up, along with several different toe, heel, and bind-off techniques. Choosing which pattern to knit first was a little tough, but I settled on Lacy Ribs. Within a few days after casting on, I discovered there’s a knitalong (KAL) group on Ravelry for the book… and it just so happens the first KAL sock for June is Lacy Ribs.

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Lacy Ribs Socks

  • Pattern: Lacy Ribs by Wendy D. Johnson (from Socks from the Toe Up)
  • Size: Medium (64 stitch circumference)
  • Needles: US 0 (2.0mm), Magic Loop 2-at-a-time
  • Yarn: Cherry Tree Hill Supersock/Wool in the Woods, one of the “lottery” colorways (a mash-up of all the dyes from that day, so there are many varieties of “lottery” colors — this one is a teal/purple blend)
  • Techniques: Judy’s Magic Cast-on toe, slip-stitch heel, Russian bind-off (went up to US 2.5 needle for bind-off)
  • Started 6/5/09, finished 6/16/09
  • Link to my Ravelry project page

This was an easy stitch pattern to memorize — only 2 pattern rows alternated with ribbing. Easy, so it’s somewhat mindless knitting while watching TV, but just interesting enough not to be boring. I had originally started these on US size 1.5 needles, but I was afraid they were coming out too big (especially for such a stretchy pattern), so I ripped them out after finishing the toe and about 1.5 repeats of the pattern, and started over on US size 0 needles. They’re a bit on the loose side, but not too baggy. I probably would have been fine making the small size instead of the medium. This was also the first time I did Russian bind-off. I really liked it and will definitely use it again. I wouldn’t have needed to go up to a US size 2.5 needle for the bind-off, though — I would have been fine going up to a US size 1.5 instead. Still, just a little loose, not so baggy that they’ll fall down. (Plus, it leaves a little room for them to tighten up with washing.)

I’m definitely looking forward to making lots more of the patterns in this book — I love Wendy’s toe-up patterns, especially with the slip-stitch heel. Up next for the June segment of the KAL is Wendy’s Sprucey Lucy pattern (each month, there’s a pattern from the book and one of Wendy’s free patterns to choose from — or to knit both). For Sprucey Lucy, I’ll use one of the yarns I bought at Lamb’s Ear Yarns last weekend, Schaefer Nichole, in the Greenjeans colorway.

SchaeferNichole

Schaefer Nichole, Greenjeans colorway

Another brief crochet interlude…

The doily is finished as well. It’s a little wonky (yes, that’s a technical term) at some spots, but overall not bad for the first one.

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Petite Pineapple Doily (please excuse the blocking pins)

  • Pattern: Petite Pineapple Doily by Priscilla Hewitt
  • Size 7 steel crochet hook
  • Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton, #10, ecru
  • Started 6/12/09, finished 6/15/09 (even though Squeek got his hind leg caught in the loose thread and ripped out almost an entire round as he ran through the house…yikes)
  • Link to my Ravelry project page

I also took a stab at crocheting a coaster…

Coaster1_XL

Quick & Easy Crocheted Coaster (why, yes, it was)

You can see something is not right below the center hole, all the way out to the edge. I think I forgot the ch2 at the end of the second round. But other than that, “Quick and Easy” is a good name for this one… it’s true.

I’ll definitely be making some more of these coasters — gotta keep trying until I get it right!

So that’s it for the FOs at the moment. You’re sure to see more socks here in the near future, what with the Socks from the Toe Up KAL going on, and Summer of Socks 2009 starting up this weekend!

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I finished the Chevron Scarf just after the Giants kicked New England’s patootie on Sunday night (I wasn’t so much rooting for the Giants to win, as I was rooting for New England to lose). No FO pictures of that one yet — gotta wash and block first because it’s rolling so much it looks more like a drainpipe cozy than a scarf. But in the meantime, I can start a new project!

Before I go and make another pair of socks for moi, I decided to take a stab at knitting up a pair of infant socks for my nephew, Billy. Because it’s just not enough that his grandmother and great aunt make all sorts of handknitted stuff for him. The cutest baby on the planet (I may be biased) just can’t have too many handknits. Anyhoo… here’s the first sock I made — the “test” version is what it has become, because I want to make some changes for the final pair (which may end up leading to more pairs…).

I had some Red Heart Baby Teri lying around. (Yes, it’s acrylic. No, I’m not a yarn snob.) I picked it up a while back at I forget where — probably Michael’s — to use for swatching some new handwoven baby blanket designs, which of course I never got around to. And since I only picked up one skein each of four colors (blue, yellow, pink, purple), I don’t have enough for anything but swatching or small items. I already made one hat each from the yellow and purple for (now former) coworkers. I hadn’t even started using the pink or blue at all.

On Sunday, it dawned on me that this yarn might make a cute pair of infant socks — it’s supposedly a worsted weight (I’m not completely sold on that fact), so it’s too thick for feet that need to fit into shoes. But hey, 6-week-old babies don’t need shoes! So infant socks in winter sounded like a good use for this yarn.

It’s not a complicated “pattern”. In fact, I hate to really call it a pattern at all. It’s just some ribbing, short rows, stockinette, toe shaping with decreases and kitchener stitch to close up the tootsies. OK, written out it looks like a lot — but really, it’s simple. I did write down a bunch of pattern notes (so I remember how to repeat), and if the final socks actually fit Billy, I will post the so-called pattern if anyone is actually reading this and is interested.

When I make the final pair of socks, I’ll be casting on more stitches for a slightly larger circumference, not doing as many short rows for the heel (it looks a bit “nippley” to me), making the cuff ribbing longer, and I think I might make the foot just a hair longer, too. (Billy is only going to grow, he ain’t gonna shrink!)

For source material, I relied on Vogue Knitting’s Ultimate Sock Book (for short-row instruction and sizing guidelines) and the experience I gained from knitting my first pair of socks, as well as several sock patterns and short-row instructions I found online.

Well… gotta get going and work on those final socks!

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This is a looooong scarf. I have never made a scarf this long. The total length is supposed to be like 70-some inches. I’m probably somewhere around 40-some inches right now. Strangely, it simultaneously feels like this thing is knitting up quickly and taking forevvvvver to get done. Really, I only cast on two weeks ago, and I’ve been working on it a little bit just about every day since then — longer on weekends. (Actually, now that I’ve made that statement, it seems like it’s taking forever to get done. But it really does seem to go fast… oops, there I go again.) Pardon the crappy photo of the scarf on the green sofa — it was nighttime, in the living room, and the photo came out really dark so I had to photoshop the heck out of it. The photo from my previous blog post is closer to the real colors.

Anyway, I’m really loving this yarn. It’s Araucania Ranco, one hank of multi and one hank of solid, fingering weight sock yarn. I really, really, really want to make socks out of it too. And speaking of socks, I can’t wait to start another pair of socks. Really. I was thinking of starting another pair of socks before finishing the scarf… but I’m afraid I’ll get all caught up in the socks and the scarf will end up taking a long snooze on the needles. Gotta get the scarf done first. I mean, it’ll be done in no time — it knits up so fast! (But it seems to take forever… hmmm, that sounds familiar.)

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Well, I now have my second (and third?) FO of 2008 — a pair of socks! I finished off the second sock on Sunday, 1/20. These were really easy to make — just plain stockinette except for the ribbing at the cuff and the slip stitch pattern in the heel flap. And really, this yarn is too busy for a pattern anyway. I will confess, I’m not nuts about the yarn — the look and the feel. Not really the most beautiful colors, but it will be fine with jeans. As far as the feel, it seems a little on the scratchy side right now, but maybe it will soften up with wear and washing.

I started my next project of 2008 before the socks were done (dangerous, I know). Like most crafters, I have my stash of UFOs (unfinished objects). But I figured I was moving along well on the socks and decided to cast on for the Chevron Scarf from Last Minute Knitted Gifts. The real reason I started this before the socks were finished was because I needed something to work on during the monthly Knit-In at Yarns R Us, and I didn’t feel right working on something I hadn’t purchased the supplies for at the shop (just my own silly reasoning).

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